Saturday, January 25, 2014

No Shortage of Sons

1032, Spring
Marlowe

Bonnibel Reardon had not heard a word from her mother since she had left to go and work for the Leolins. Sir Ancel himself had requested Glyn specifically, leaving Bonnie to serve Sir Soren and his family. She was almost grateful when she had learned they would be moving to court permanently, hoping that she might find a friend in her sister – who had worked in the kitchens at court for a good half of their lives. But Bonnie was a stranger to the younger girl, and their interactions had been brief and few. She spent most of her days running errands for Lady Jaslyn, wife of Sir Soren. It was strange to think that Lady Jaslyn had been little but a servant herself as a child – being a member of the Omari family, who had gained the king’s favour when they betrayed Lord Kovar’s plot to the king. The Omari’s had served the Kovars for generations, and in betraying him they had gained nobility and land.

Bonnie was carrying a tray of food to her masters quarters, where they sometimes took their meals in the privacy of their own rooms. She was quiet when she entered, trying her hardest to leave the two occupants undisturbed. Sir Soren was standing with his hands on his hips, looking down at where is darkly skinned wife was seated. Bonnie moved toward the table, and couldn’t help but overhear their conversation.
Sir Soren was speaking, “We have our daughter marry the younger prince, Kahane.”

“It’s not that simple, the king is set on making peace with the Drakis.” Lady Jaslyn replied, “I would expect that once Kahane comes of age, he will ask for their other daughter as well.”
“Then Riagan,” Sir Soren said firmly. “The king has no shortage of sons.”
“And how exactly do we arrange the passing of not one prince but two?”
“Kahane has a fondness for hunting,” Sir Soren mused.

“It would all be a lot simpler if not for the Draki’s dislike for the new laws,” Lady Jaslyn sighed heavily, in a way that was to express her unhappiness.
Sir Soren growled to his wife, “Or if we had another daughter.”
Bonnie kept her face blank, it was not uncommon to hear her masters speaking of such things, and she knew that showing any reaction to their conversation would gain her severe punishment. She went about setting their food for them, absently listening to their conversation.

“We only have one daughter, Soren. And she’s turning out to be a beauty, so I doubt another would have been necessary.”
“Not necessary but certainly a comfort.” Sir Soren crossed his arms, “My brother has two bastard daughters, and who is to say he won’t offer them to Cohen or Kahane? If one of them produced a son…”
“Only one of his daughters is even slightly attractive, I think you’re overestimating these boys and what they would be drawn to.” Lady Jaslyn reasoned, “Skinny low born girls with dirt toned features or one great beauty with the elegance of a lady?”
“Two great beauties would have been preferable.”
Their conversation came to an abrupt halt, as Sir Soren’s stubbornness was no match for his wife’s reasoning. Bonnie felt a sense of dread creeping up on her, feeling their steely gaze on her. She quickly fumbled to straighten her apron and turned to leave.

7 comments:

  1. This was interesting to write, I wanted to provide insight to just how differently the classes live in Marlowe, for example Bonnie doesn't have a relationship with her sister at all, and her life is consumed with the day to day task of serving the nobles. She doesn't have friends, hobbies or interests, she doesn't know how to read or write, she probably has small dreams but realism keeps them at bay.
    Also, here is the truth about Soren, although he is trying to overtake his brother and gain the entire family fortune his scheming is very grand and ever-reaching.

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  2. I like this new chapter ^^ It's interesting to see how families are plotting to gain more influence or power, especially because such a thing was very common at various times in history. I'm sure those two, Sir Soren and Lady Jaslyn, aren't the only ones to be making plans and that there are many more nobles that are "training" their daughters to be sent to the Court.
    Bonnie's future doesn't seem too bright to me, but that too was a common thing and I'm also sure she's not the only girl that lives there, in her masters' shadow. Maybe she'll find a man that will love her and take her away from Sir Soren's family (because other than that ... there's no other thing that she could do, aside from giving in to some noble's advances).

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    1. It's interesting because Lady Jaslyn came from a family of servants just like Bonnies', yet she doesn't see any harm in exposing Bonnie to their scheming - though all it would take on Bonnie's part is to tell the king what she had heard.
      In Bonnie's next appearance, it addresses her belief that love doesn't exist. Then in the post after that, she actually develops a crush, and her perspective changes a little. :P Thank you for reading!

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    2. Yet, who would give a mere servant a fair hearing, especially if she talks about plots among the nobles? She's only a lowborn girl whose only function is to serve her masters. She does not have any kind of power, so she is not a threat to Lady Jaslyn's plans.
      Maybe that's why I like Bonnibel as a character so much. I know she's practically powerless, yet I still hope to see her coming out on top somehow.

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    3. Although you would think no one would listen or believe her, (And chances are no one or very few people would) the king would investigate even at the word of a servant. It is probably Conri's only saving grace, that he is overcautious about his throne, and has a history of counteracting plots against his life - based on mere rumours.
      But, as Jaslyn and Soren are only talking and haven't set in stone any plans to murder the princes, they technically haven't committed a crime.
      (In Marlowe, there must be committed intent that is measurable for it to be put to trial)
      And yeah, Bonnie has already won my heart. I think that a triumph for Bonnie would be something small, such as making a friend. But I have plans for her to find joy in some things, I haven't decided where she'll be in the end though.

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  3. Yeah, sounds like Ancel might be the lesser of two evils. I still don't think I'll be able to like Ancel unless he really makes it up to Nolia, but at least Ancel's not plotting anyone's murder so he can have a grandson who is a king (no doubt with him pulling the strings in the background, if he's still alive at the time), gain Conri's favour, and one-up his brother.

    Here's hoping all his plans go down the toilet one way or another. I'll need to see more of Cohen to be sure, but from the little we've seen of him, he does seem to be much better man than his father, and Marlowe needs that. I'd hope that Kahane is better than Conri as well, but we haven't had any proof of that either way.

    Any chance that Bonnie could eventually go serve someone better? Someone who might teach her to read and write and acknowledge she's more than some sort of machine that makes sandwiches appear?

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    1. Ancel has always had to be one step ahead of his brother, so although Soren may seem the less dangerous one, maybe Ancel is just better at disguising himself. I don't think Ancel is a bad guy, but he has done bad things. That being said, him and Nolia have to sort out their issues, but I don't think that can happen until she admits Miklos is not the father of Dalan.
      I think Cohen would make an excellent king, if anything because of his rebelliousness against his father - and defiance of how his father does things. Kahane is probably the most like his father out of all of Conri's sons (Kaz being second most) and he has his eyes on the throne. So overall I can't say things are going to go smoothly for any of the princes, that;s the problem with having so many sons - each of them want to inherit the most!
      Even if Bonnie got away from the Rideres, there would just be another girl put in her place. And frankly servants go unnoticed by all the nobles - not because they're cruel or unfair, simply because they were raised that way. Soren and his wife is probably the second worst family to be serving though, (second to the king who likes to deflower his female servants) as they are unnecessarily severe and cruel.

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